How to make a lace necklace

Remember I told you last week that I was making a quilt for a friend’s daughter who’s going off to college this Fall? I finished the quilt and the tutorial is posted on Crafting a Green World. And boy, was she surprised when she saw it. She said, “Wow. This is cool!” and “So, that’s where my purple shirt was!”

The best part was seeing her recognize her old ripped up jeans on the quilt. That was her favorite (and most expensive) pair of jeans she owned. According to my friend, she loved that pair of jeans so much that she wore it down until there was a gaping hole on the butt! So she was glad to see it surface again (she thought her mom threw it out!) and to take it with her to college.

With this quilt, I know she’ll carry a piece of her ‘childhood’, *sniffle*, with her when she leaves in a couple of weeks. I hope the quilt will help her if (and when) she gets homesick. She is like a daughter to me and I can’t believe she’s grown up so fast! I wish only the best for her and hope she enjoys what promises to be the best times of her life. Oh, and while studying, or course.

I also gave her this necklace that I made when writing the tutorial for Crafting a Green World. I made some adjustments to it and added a little dangling fresh water pearl. She will be a fashionista on campus!

lace necklace

How to make a lace necklace

A Crochet Lace Necklace.

I’m sure you’ve seen these chic vintage-y crochet necklaces everywhere. It is the vintage-come-modern look and it goes with everything. You can dress it up or down. All you need to make this dainty necklace are a little bit of jewelry making skill, (using pliers with jump rings,) an old lace scrap, and a necklace chain, preferably from a thrifted necklace.

Let’s get glammed!

Supplies:

  • Lace
  • Natural Glue/Stiffening Method of your choice – corn starch is translucent so it’s good for colored lace like this one.
  • Necklace Chain
  • Pliers
  • Plastic Tray or a plate for drying

Instruction:
Cut out an ornate pattern from your lace pile with a pair of small scissors with sharp points. You’ll need the sharp points for cutting around the intricate corners and curves.

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Soak the lace in the stiffening solution of your choice. Squeeze out the excess liquid using your index finger and thumb. This one is in the Elmer’s Glue solution and as you can see, it turns the lace color a little white at first but it dries clear so don’t be alarmed.

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Lay your lace flat on a surface that won’t stick to the lace, like a plastic lid or a plate. I used a plastic lid that I was about to recycle. Once it’s flat, dab the excess glue from holes and in between the mesh with a small rag. If you don’t, you’ll just have one piece of fabric without the intricate lace design when it dries. That wouldn’t be cool.

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Lay your lace flat on a surface that won’t stick to the lace, like a plastic lid or a plate. I used a plastic lid that I was about to recycle. Once it’s flat, dab the excess glue from holes and in between the mesh with a small rag. If you don’t, you’ll just have one piece of fabric without the intricate lace design when it dries. That wouldn’t be cool.

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Let it dry over night. The lace might curl depending on which stiffening solution you use. Corn and flour starch tend to curl a little more, but don’t worry if it curls because you can steam iron to flatten it.

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Cover the lace with a light cotton fabric and steam iron over it quickly. If the lace gets stuck to the fabric, peel if off right away, gently.

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Lay the ironed lace flat and adjust the shape a little more. Then, cut the edges off with the sharp pointed scissors around the perimeter of the pattern you want. If there are thin threaded lines, like the one above, you can decide to leave which ones intact without compromising the sturdiness.

Add the chains on both sides and then, ta dah!

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NOTE: The information in this post is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Dr. Karen disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information. Opinions and statements on this website have not been evaluated by the Food & Drug Administration. The information is for general consumer understanding and education, and should not be considered or used as a substitute for medical advice and it is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. I am not your doctor and you should consult with a qualified health care professional on any matter relating to their health and well being on one-on-one basis with thorough physical examination. Dr. Karen encourages you to make your own health care decisions based upon your research and in partnership with a qualified health care professional. Products Dr. Karen recommends and their properties have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. If you are pregnant, nursing, taking medication, or have a medical condition, consult your physician before using the products. For more info, visit the Disclaimer page.

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